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How to implement the circular economy in the Textile industry?

How to implement the circular economy in the Textile industry?

How To Implement The Circular Economy In The Textile Industry?In recent years, the textile industry has faced heightened scrutiny due to its significant environmental impact, ranging from resource depletion to waste generation. In response to these challenges, there has been a growing emphasis on adopting sustainable practices, with the circular economy emerging as a promising solution. The circular economy model aims to minimize waste and promote the efficient use of resources, making it particularly relevant to the textile industry. If your company has surplus materials such as textiles, yarns or offcuts, clear space and make money by selling them to other brands with Recovo.The challenge of the linear economy:Traditionally, the textile industry has followed a linear economy model, in which raw materials are extracted, processed, turned into products and finally discarded as waste. This linear approach leads to massive resource consumption, high levels of pollution and a considerable carbon footprint. The linear model is not only environmentally unsustainable, but also economically inefficient.Principles of the circular economy:The circular economy for textiles is based on three fundamental principles: reduce, reuse and recycle. By adopting these principles, the industry can make the transition to a more circular and environmentally friendly approach.Reduce:To reduce the environmental impact of textiles, the industry must focus on minimizing resource consumption. This involves using environmentally friendly materials, optimizing production processes and designing products with longevity in mind. The concept of “slow fashion” encourages consumers to buy fewer, higher-quality items, promoting a move away from the fast-fashion, disposable culture. Reduce waste by reusing it with our Software-as-a-ServiceReuse:Reusing textile products is a key aspect of the circular economy. It involves extending the useful life of products through initiatives such as clothing rentals, second-hand markets and upcycling. By promoting reuse, the industry can significantly reduce the amount of discarded textiles, slowing the rate at which new materials are needed. Give surplus materials a second life.Recycling:Textile recycling plays a crucial role in closing the loop of the circular economy. It involves collecting and processing used textiles to create new materials. Advances in recycling technologies, such as mechanical and chemical recycling, enable the industry to transform old garments into new fabrics. In addition, recycling reduces reliance on virgin materials, reducing the environmental impact of textile production. Recycle unsold garments and fabrics into new fabrics and yarn or de-cycle them when this is not possible. EXPLORE OUR SELECTION OF COTTON FABRICS SHOP Challenges and Opportunities:While the transition to a circular economy for textiles presents numerous benefits, it is not without its challenges. Key obstacles include the need for technological advancements, consumer awareness, and industry-wide collaboration. However, the opportunities for innovation, job creation, and improved brand reputation are significant motivators for businesses to embrace sustainable practices.Governments around the world are recognizing the importance of sustainable practices in the textile industry and are implementing regulations to encourage the adoption of circular economy principles. These may include tax incentives, waste reduction targets, and extended producer responsibility (EPR) programs. By aligning policies with circular economy goals, governments play a pivotal role in driving positive change.Conclusion:The shift towards a circular textile economy is essential for the long-term sustainability of the industry. By adopting the principles of reduce, reuse and recycle, companies can mitigate environmental impact, reduce resource consumption and contribute to a more sustainable and resilient future. As consumers become more environmentally conscious, demand for responsibly produced textile products is likely to increase, making the circular economy not only an ethical choice, but also a smart business strategy. In short, the circular economy in textiles is more than a trend: it is a necessary evolution towards a greener, more sustainable future for the industry and the planet. Reduce waste, minimise costs and speed up the fashion production process by accessing real-time data on your in-house stock with Recovo’s Upcycling Saas. DO YOU WANT TO BE UPDATED WITH ALL THE NEWS ABOUT CIRCULARITY IN FASHION? Subscribe to Newsletter

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What are next-gen fabrics and how to implement them in your collection

What are next-gen fabrics and how to implement them in your collection

What Are Next-Gen Fabrics And How To Implement Them In Your CollectionImage credits: 2020-21 look by Mariam Al Sibai made from Piñatex.What are next-gen fabrics?Next-generation fabrics or “next-gen” materials are non-plastic, non-synthetic and vegan fabrics that serve as ethical and sustainable alternatives to conventional fabrics for use in fashion, home products and more.Why do we need next-gen fabrics?Next-gen fabrics serve primarily as replacements for animal-based materials such as leather, fur, wool and down. The current generation of alternatives – petroleum-derived synthetics – also have serious environmental and social problems, so innovation in these types of materials, which are more environmentally conscious and of higher quality, is growing.You can find next-gen fabrics in our category of Materials of the Future.What are next-gen materials made of?As more companies get involved in materials innovation, the technologies behind next-generation fabrics are diversifying. Some 21.6% of companies specializing in next-gen materials develop these materials from microbes, while 8.2% use Mycelium, a fungus for the manufacture of vegan leather that is ideal when it comes to better replicating the performance and aesthetics of animal-derived leather.Innovation in next-generation fabrics has also led to the creation of new fabrics, such as those made from pineapple. Piñatex, a pineapple leather, is one of the main alternatives to leather and, in addition to being animal-friendly, does not require the petrochemicals often used in fake leather.Other examples of non-conventional materials are algae bioplastic (a combination of seaweed powder with fats from other species of algae), soy cashmere (made from soy protein from the surplus of tofu production), and rose petal silks (fabrics made from fallen rose petals, converted into thread and dyed with natural pigments), among others.“Innovation in next generation fabrics has also led to the creation of other fabrics, such as, for example, pineapple.” Pictured: pineapple fabric from Recovo. EXPLORE OUR SELECTION OF NEXT-GEN FABRICS SHOP Next-generation fabrics, a market that is constantly innovating and growingBrands are mostly opting for next-generation materials in the expectation of increasing their revenues in tandem with their sustainability and anti-animal cruelty policies.According to a study by Material Innovation Initiative, out of 95 companies engaged in the manufacture of next-gen materials, 55 were created after 2014, and 10 have been established since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, demonstrating the high growth of the sector.The study itself estimates that $2.3 billion has been invested in next-gen fabrics since 2015, with the amount of investment in 2021 being more than double that in 2020. Even at the height of the pandemic, the capital invested in 2021 alone is almost equivalent to that of the previous 4 years combined. It is also estimated that the size of the global wholesale market for next-gen materials will be approx. $2.2 billion in 2026, representing a 3% share of a $70+ billion market.The only downside to materials innovation? Lack of supply. Unfortunately, there are more interested investors than investment opportunities, so more initiatives are needed for the creation of next-gen fabrics.In conclusion, next-generation material innovation enables the use of more ethical and sustainable alternatives to conventional fabrics. Fortunately, there is more and more investment in these materials, however, the supply still lags far behind, so it is very important that more companies join the growth of this sector.If you are looking for innovative fabrics for your next collection and you are thinking of doing it in a circular and sustainable way, you can find in our catalog fabrics that contribute to reduce textile waste and the environmental impact of fashion. You can also try to sell your leftover fabrics, maybe someone is looking for them!You can find next-gen fabrics in our category of Materials of the Future.

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Viscose fabric: what it is, characteristics, applications and much more

Viscose fabric: what it is, characteristics, applications and much more

Viscose Fabric: What It Is, Characteristics, Applications And Much MoreViscose, also known as rayon, is one of the most widely used fabrics in the fashion world. Recently, it has gained popularity in response to the demand for natural fibres; but what exactly is Viscose, where does it come from, what are its characteristics, and is it really a natural fabric?What is viscose?Viscose is a type of semi-synthetic fabric, created as a cheaper artificial alternative to silk, resulting from the extraction of cellulose fibres from the core of some trees such as pine, bamboo or eucalyptus converted into fabric yarns.How viscose is madeViscose is made by processing cellulose xanthate, the main constituent of plant cell walls, which is extracted from wood and plant fibres into a viscous liquid that is then subjected to a series of chemical processes to make a fibre that mimics the qualities of natural fibres such as silk and cotton.Find circular viscose fabrics in our category for Viscose Fabrics.Are viscose and rayon the same thing?Although viscose is commonly called rayon, it is actually a variant of rayon, as are modal and lyocell. These variants differ mainly in the manufacturing process, as they are each treated differently and become fabrics with different properties. Rayon itself is made by the cellulose dipping process, and unlike viscose rayon, it is not extracted from plant fibres, but only made from bamboo or wood cellulose.History of viscose rayonViscose rayon was originally created in 1883 by Edward John Bevan and Charles Frederick Cross, as a cheaper artificial alternative to silk, as it has a drape and soft feel similar to the luxury material. The first commercial viscose rayon was produced by a British company in November 1905. The name “rayon” was adopted in 1924, and “viscose” was used for the viscous organic liquid used to make rayon and cellophane. In Europe, however, the fabric itself came to be called “viscose”, which has been considered an acceptable alternative term for rayon.Characteristics of viscose fabricViscose fabric is very soft to the touch and often has the look of silk and the feel of cotton. Chemically, viscose resembles cotton, but it can also take on many different qualities depending on its manufacture.It is a very versatile fabric and a suitable choice whether used alone or blended with other fabrics. The lustrous appearance of viscose fabrics gives them an expensive look, despite being quite affordable in general. Viscose is also a hypoallergenic and highly breathable material, capable of keeping cool in hot weather and also useful for providing a basic level of insulation in cold temperatures; it does not trap heat and wicks away water and sweat very well, making it ideal for T-shirts and sportswear.It is not a stretch fabric, but can be blended with other fabrics, such as spandex, to add stretch. It drapes well and can be used to create draping and movement in various garments and styles.It also dyes easily; it can retain colour without fading, even after prolonged wear and washing, so it definitely appeals to fashion designers and industry experts (which is why you are likely to find viscose in the most fashionable colours and shades). It features deep, bright colours that do not change.Find circular viscose fabrics in our category for Viscose Fabrics. Measure fashion’s environmental impact Discover the water used, CO2 & phosphorus emissions related to a garment or fashion collection with our calculator. DOWNLOAD THE CALCULATOR Uses and applicationsViscose rayon is widely used in clothing because of its soft and comfortable feel, and can be found in different types of garments such as blouses and shirts, sportswear, as well as in smaller accessories such as scarves. It can be found in cotton end uses, as well as in luxurious velvets and taffetas; it can also be found in feminine hygiene products, in tyre cords, and as an interior fabric for curtains, tablecloths, napkins, bed linings and blankets.How to care for viscose fabricAlthough viscose is a durable material, it loses much of its strength when wet due to its ability to absorb moisture, so it is very important to treat wet viscose garments with care. Viscose garments should be dry cleaned; it is preferable to avoid washing machines and hand wash in cold water, using a mild detergent while gently working the fabric, as it shrinks easily. After washing, rinse and shake out the water and hang the garments or lay them out to dry, preferably avoiding direct sunlight. Wringing out or squeezing viscose rayon may damage its fibres, spoiling the look and feel of the fabric. If the fabric is stained, being a fabric that absorbs colours easily, removing dried stains will be more difficult.Environmental impact: is viscose a sustainable material?Despite the many benefits of viscose, its manufacturing process can be harmful to the environment, especially if it is mass-produced. On the one hand, due to deforestation, viscose is derived from wood and natural fibres. On the other hand, viscose production uses a high concentration of toxic chemicals that pollute the air and water, such as sulphur, nitrous oxides and carbon. In addition, viscose production uses a lot of water, both in the irrigation of trees and in the process of converting those trees into the fabric.However, viscose is biodegradable, although the environmental impact of its production is still high. Therefore, if you want to use this fabric, we recommend using existing viscose to avoid its excessive production, the pollution involved in making it, and the consumption of unnecessary resources. If your company has surplus materials like textiles, yarns or trimmings, clear some space and earn money by selling it to other brands with Recovo. In our circular knitting catalogue, you can find viscose and other materials for your next collections that contribute to reducing the environmental impact of fashion. You can also reduce waste, minimize expenses and speed up the fashion production process, accesing real-time data on your internal stock with the Upcycling Saas by Recovo. Find circular viscose fabrics in our category for Viscose Fabrics. DO YOU WANT TO BE UPDATED WITH ALL THE NEWS ABOUT CIRCULARITY IN FASHION? Subscribe to Newsletter

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Why is textile reusing one of the most sustainable solutions for producing fashion?

Why is textile reusing one of the most sustainable solutions for producing fashion?

Why Is Textile Reusing One Of The Most Sustainable Solutions For Producing Fashion?The global textile industry is estimated to have used over 109 million tonnes of fibers last year alone. Given the fact that it is the second-biggest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions globally, more and more brands are developing products that are environmentally conscious to meet their sustainability goals.Every year, millions of tonnes of clothes are produced. Textile production produces an estimated 1.2 billion tonnes of CO2 and consumes 79 billion cubic meters of fresh water annually, which has a direct impact on the planet and the environment. In addition, the dyes used to change the color of fabrics contain toxic chemicals that factories dump into rivers and lakes, degrading the surrounding ecosystems and endangering the health of the population nearby.For these reasons sustainability has been recognized as a major concern for the textile industry. Action is imperative and innovative manufacturing processes that are not harmful to the environment are urgently needed.Fabric waste, fashion’s biggest problemThe reality is that 92 tonnes of textile waste are generated annually, which is disposed of in landfills or burned. In fact, one garbage truck full of textiles is landfilled or burned every second according to a report by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation. Discarded fabrics, which is common in deserts like Chile’s Atacama, takes hundreds of years to biodegrade, damaging the ecosystem and water.In the textile industry, sustainability extends beyond the use of organic materials and efficient methods. It entails tackling the entire production chain all the way to the designing stage to be more responsible with the materials that already exist.Reduce waste, minimize expenses and speed up the fashion production process, accesing real-time data on your internal stock with the Upcycling Saas by Recovo.A circular economy-based approach is the way to go. To keep materials in use, innovative business models and collaboration across the value chain is required. Measure fashion’s environmental impact Discover the water used, CO2 & phosphorus emissions related to a garment or fashion collection with our calculator. DOWNLOAD THE CALCULATOR Reusing fabrics: the way to fight wasteCircular models present a challenge in terms of rethinking how we produce fashion, and use and dispose of them, but they also present tremendous opportunities for new ventures and/or innovative business models that contribute to the sustainable development goals by implementing the 3 R’s approach.- Reducing: Measuring better the stock quantities needed for production is s a fit solution to avoid waste. However, the industry is still not shaped this way. Companies usually source an extra 5% of the fabric they need to prevent manufacturing mistakes and in-plant problems.- Recycling: It consists of the processing of fibres and clothing remnants from the manufacturing process. Several governments have proposed measures to improve recycling recently like the Strategy for Sustainable and Circular Textiles by the UN. Although recycling is a great solution to reduce waste, it still uses energy and resources to break down and remanufacture the fabrics, so it only solves part of the problem.- Reusing. The most efficient alternative. It consists of reusing surplus textile to avoid creating new, i.e. to use the surplus fabrics as raw material for new collections instead of consuming precious resources to create fabrics that already exist. By doing this, brands are contributing to a circular fashion model, the best option to minimize environmental impact since, contrary to recycling, there’s no need to produce new fabrics.© Recovo The cycle of reusing fabrics in a circular fashion model.By reusing textile waste, brands are able to make more sustainable garments for their customers and contribute to the preservation of the environment.1 meter of Recovo fabric saves around 5,700L of waterIf you are a brand in need of fabrics for your next collections, explore our catalogue of circular textiles and contribute to lowering the environmental impact of fashion.If your company has surplus materials like textiles, yarns or trimmings, clear some space and earn money by selling it to other brands with Recovo.Don’t forget to sign up for our newsletter to stay up to date on new fabric entries – you get 10% off your first order when subscribing to our database. EXPLORE OUR SELECTION OF CIRCULAR FABRICS SHOP

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Why are fashion brands creating digital passports for their garments?

Why are fashion brands creating digital passports for their garments?

Why Are Fashion Brands Creating Digital Passports For Their Garments?By 2050, the European Union plans to achieve zero greenhouse gas emissions, that is, to be climate neutral. To this end, the EC has launched a new package of regulations as part of the European Green Pact, a proposal that aims to make almost all physical goods circular and energy efficient by 2030.The aim of this regulation is therefore to contribute to the fight against climate change through the implementation of a circular economy, to decouple the existing relationship between economic growth and waste production. Within its Strategy for Circular and Sustainable Textiles, it also emphasizes the importance of regulating the textile industry, which it has ranked as the fourth industry with the greatest environmental impact, and aims to ensure that textile products marketed in European markets are durable, recyclable, free of hazardous substances and produced in a sustainable manner. The measures of this strategy include, among others, the implementation of a digital product passport to all physical goods from 2023. In this post, we explain everything you need to know about these passports.What are digital passports? Digital passports, which are planned to be introduced next year, will be a collection of information about the manufacturing process of each product so that users along the supply chain can reuse or recycle them properly, and will be useful to know if any material prevents recycling or is very polluting. In the fashion world, if a garment has a digital passport, it will have a QR code or an NFC, RFID or Bluetooth tag containing detailed information about the product. The inclusion of these passports on clothing and other items will bring more transparency to the fashion industry by including information about the raw material composition of the garment, the manufacturing process and even the method of transportation.In the fashion world, the clothing labels would come with a QR code or others with detailed product information.Who are digital passports intended for?Although the EU wants to make the digital passport a standard for all products marketed in Europe, for now, the priority is focused on the textile, construction and automotive sectors. EXPLORE OUR SELECTION OF CIRCULAR FABRICS WITH TRACEABILITY DATA SHOP What information will the digital passports have to contain?Consumers will have clear, reliable and easily accessible information about the products they consume, how to maintain them and how best to recycle them. However, a great deal of work is needed to be able to identify exactly what information users need along the supply chain. As a result, the European Commission will review the scheme on a product-by-product basis, the process will be governed in separate acts and will require the entire supply chain to sit down and discuss the key information that should be included in the passport.Complications of digital passport implementation and intellectual property However, manufacturers and all professionals involved will face major challenges in creating, sharing and distributing the required data in a simple and cost-effective manner. The European legislative initiative is necessary and meets the criteria of sustainability and digital transformation, but it will really be a big challenge for companies.In addition, concerns center on intellectual property and privacy. The concept of exposing all product information sounds contradictory to intellectual property protection, but this is where the issue of encryption comes in to protect this information. And yet, there will be cases where companies do not want to share certain data, even if it is encrypted, because it is linked to confidential information, so being transparent in justifying green claims can be tricky.In these cases, ZKPs, or zero-knowledge protocols, can provide a way to achieve this data transmission by allowing sustainability information to be shared without revealing confidential product data. This will allow manufacturers to selectively share information throughout the supply chain without the need to store data or compromise data security.Zero-knowledge protocols can provide a way to achieve data transmission by enabling the sharing of sustainability information without revealing confidential product data..Digital passports, a way to address greenwashing and textile wasteThe information in the digital passports will be crucial to address greenwashing, as they will force companies to disclose whether their products are truly safe, easy to maintain and recyclable, as well as whether their activities are truly aligned with environmental protection.In addition, this passport can help eliminate textile waste, as large companies that handle surplus product will be obliged to disclose the quantities discarded per year, the reason for discarding, and the amount of waste they have handed over for reuse, use, recycling, recycling, energy recovery and disposal activities in accordance with the waste hierarchy. In addition, they will need to ensure that this information is available, either on a public website or other means.In conclusion, digital passports are a good measure to reduce the environmental impact of new product production, in addition to increasing recycling and circularity of fabrics.If you want to launch your next collection in a circular way and in accordance with European sustainability regulations, you can find in our catalog fabrics that contribute to reducing textile waste and the environmental impact of fashion. You can also try to sell your leftover fabrics, someone might be looking for them!Find circular fabrics that comply with digital passport regulations and help fight textile waste in our category for Recycled and Recyclable fabrics. DO YOU WANT TO BE UPDATED WITH ALL THE NEWS ABOUT CIRCULARITY IN FASHION? Subscribe to Newsletter

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What is non-woven fabric? Everything you need to know about it

What is non-woven fabric? Everything you need to know about it

What Is Non-Woven Fabric? Everything You Need To Know About ItWhat is non-woven fabric (NWF)?Non-wovens or non-woven fabrics are fabrics that are produced by mechanical, thermal or chemical processes, but without being woven and without the need to convert fibers into yarn, since the fiber webs are bonded together as a result of the inherent friction (entanglement) from one fiber to another thanks to these non-conventional processes.What is the origin of nonwoven fabrics and how are they produced?To form the nonwoven fabric, textile fibers are randomly dumped into a tray without any one direction needing to predominate and are bonded to each other by mechanical, chemical or heat means in the form of webs, mats or sheets. Nonwoven fabrics are made mainly from polymers, are inexpensive, have high strength and are commonly used for plastics. They can consist of one or several layers, such as SMS fabrics, which are trilaminated.These fabrics can be made from fibers (the most commonly used are polyester and viscose rayon) and both artificial and natural filaments.Types of non-woven fabricsThe two main types of nonwoven fabric are NWF in polypropylene (PP) and NWF in Spunbond-Meltblown-Spunbond (SMS), depending on the process used to create them.NWF in polypropylene.Polypropylene is a fabric made of soft textured plastic fibers which are fused together using ultrasound and steam. There are different thicknesses of this material and due to its hygienic characteristics it is ideal in the health sector due to the high safety it provides to doctors, patients and the user in general, in addition to the cost-effectiveness it offers.NWF in Spunbond-Meltblown-Spunbond (SMS).This type of fabric consists of 3 layers and is also made from 100% polypropylene. Of these 3 layers, the two outer layers are Spunbond and the middle layer is Meltblown.* Spunbond. To form a spunbond or Spunbond nonwoven fabric, polypropylene is stretched into a continuous filament, which is then placed in a web along a conveyor belt. With the addition of chemical, thermal or mechanical bonding processes, the fibers form a strong, durable fabric, which is often used in applications such as carpet backing or filters.* Meltblown. Like a spunbond nonwoven, a meltblown nonwoven also uses polypropylene, but it is fed through a linear matrix to form long, thin fibers. These fibers are cooled by bursts of hot air, which are then forced through a collector mesh to form a fabric that creates a fine filter and is self-adhesive. Meltblown nonwovens are widely used in the production of medical masks, diapers and feminine hygiene products.By making this 3-layer “sandwich”, you get an improved fabric as you combine and add the properties of both types of fabrics while reducing the disadvantages of each. EXPLORE OUR SELECTION OF CIRCULAR FABRICS SHOP Principal characteristics of NWFThe nonwoven fabric has a wide variety of characteristics that bring them great utility. It is a lightweight, tough yet elastic fabric, breathable, soft, durable and sheds far fewer fibers than other fabrics. It repels water and liquids, has a high absorption capacity, and is resistant to high temperatures. In addition, it is easy to care for as it can be ironed, dry cleaned and is wrinkle resistant.In terms of fashion, it becomes an attractive fabric because of its great drapeability, it can be easily dyed without color fading, and it can be sewn.Uses and benefits of NWFIn the fashion industry, nonwovens are used for applications such as the creation of linings and footwear components, but above all, NWF is used in the production of industrial workwear, chemical defense suits and isolation and sanitary protective clothing such as face masks, as it is a non-flammable fabric, filters the air to bar the way to dust and provide an effective barrier against bacteria and viruses.Non-woven fabric close-up. This type of fabric is very used in sanitary applications like masks or surgical gowns.In conclusion, nonwoven fabric is a fabric with a wide variety of applications, which has become especially fashionable due to the Covid-19 health crisis.If you are looking for fabrics for your next collection and you are thinking of doing it in a circular and sustainable way, you can find in our catalog fabrics that contribute to reduce textile waste and the environmental impact of fashion. You can also try to sell your leftover fabrics, maybe someone is looking for them!Don’t forget to join our newsletter to keep up to date with new fabric entries – you will get a 10% discount on your first order just for subscribing. DO YOU WANT TO BE UPDATED WITH ALL THE NEWS ABOUT CIRCULARITY IN FASHION? Subscribe to Newsletter

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Sustainable Materials for the fashion business: must-haves for environmentally committed brands

Sustainable Materials for the fashion business: must-haves for environmentally committed brands

Sustainable Materials For The Fashion Business: Must-Haves For Environmentally Committed BrandsIn recent years, sustainability has become a driving force in the fashion industry. As consumers become more eco-conscious, fashion executives are recognizing the importance of adopting sustainable practices throughout their supply chains. One critical aspect of this transformation is the use of sustainable materials. In this guide, we’ll explore the world of sustainable materials, why they matter, and how fashion executives can make informed choices to steer their brands towards a more sustainable future.Organic FabricsOrganic cotton, hemp, and bamboo:Popular choices for sustainable fashion. These materials are grown without synthetic pesticides and genetically modified organisms, reducing harm to the environment and ensuring the health of workers.Organic Wool:Ethical and eco-friendly wool sourced from sheep raised without synthetic chemicals, hormones, or antibiotics. This soft and warm material supports animal welfare and reduces environmental impact.Organic Leather:Sustainable leather produced from animals raised under humane conditions and tanned without harmful chemicals. It offers the same quality as traditional leather with a reduced ecological footprint.Recycled MaterialsRecycled materials, such as recycled polyester and post-consumer recycled denim, provide a solution to the issue of textile waste. They minimize the need for new resource extraction and reduce landfill waste, making them a prime choice for eco-conscious fashion brands.Deadstock FabricsDeadstock fabrics, often overlooked in the fashion industry, offer a sustainable and cost-effective solution. By repurposing excess materials that would otherwise go to waste, they significantly reduce the environmental impact of textile production. Their limited availability also allows fashion designers to create unique, one-of-a-kind pieces, appealing to consumers seeking individuality in their fashion choices.Tencel and ModalTencel and Modal are derived from sustainably managed wood pulp, typically sourced from eucalyptus, beech, or birch trees. They are known for their softness, breathability, and minimal environmental impact, making them appealing options for sustainable fashion.Piñatex and Mushroom LeatherInnovations like Piñatex (made from pineapple leaf fibers) and mushroom leather offer cruelty-free alternatives to animal leather. These materials are biodegradable and have a much smaller environmental footprint compared to traditional leather.HempHemp is a versatile and sustainable material that requires minimal water and no pesticides. It’s durable, breathable, and has a minimal environmental impact, making it a popular choice for eco-friendly fashion brands.ConclusionThe adoption of sustainable materials is a crucial step towards a more responsible and environmentally-friendly fashion industry. Fashion executives must recognize that sustainability is not just a trend but a fundamental shift in consumer expectations.RECOVO leads the charge in fashion circularity with a fabric marketplace offering eco-friendly and deadstock materials, an upcycle program for circular fashion, and innovative software for efficient deadstock management. In a world where sustainability is a fundamental shift in consumer expectations, RECOVO empowers fashion executives to navigate towards a more eco-friendly future. DO YOU WANT TO BE UPDATED WITH ALL THE NEWS ABOUT CIRCULARITY IN FASHION? Subscribe to Newsletter

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What is Upcycling? The next step in sustainable fashion

What is Upcycling? The next step in sustainable fashion

What Is Upcycling? The Next Step In Sustainable FashionAs the fashion industry faces with the environmental impact of fast fashion, consumers and designers alike are turning their attention to sustainable alternatives. One such innovative and eco-friendly approach gaining popularity is upcycling. It represents a shift towards a more conscious and responsible fashion ecosystem, offering a creative solution to reduce waste and breathe new life into discarded materials. Reduce waste, minimize expenses and speed up the fashion production process, accesing real-time data on your internal stock with the Upcycling Saas by Recovo.Defining Upcycling:At its core, upcycling is the transformative process of turning waste materials, unwanted products, or by-products into new, higher-value items. Unlike traditional recycling, which often involves breaking down materials into their basic components for the creation of new products, upcycling focuses on repurposing existing items without fundamentally altering their original form. In the realm of fashion, upcycling involves taking pre-existing garments or materials and reimagining them into fresh, stylish pieces.The Environmental Impact of Fast Fashion:The fast fashion industry, characterized by its rapid production and consumption of inexpensive, trendy clothing, has come under increasing scrutiny for its detrimental effects on the environment. This industry contributes to pollution, the depletion of natural resources, and the generation of vast amounts of textile waste. Upcycling offers a compelling alternative to combat these issues, providing a sustainable and creative approach to fashion production that aligns with the principles of the circular economy.The Upcycling Process:The journey of upcycling in fashion begins with the sourcing of discarded or unwanted materials. This can encompass old clothing, fabric scraps, or even unconventional items like curtains and upholstery. Designers and artisans then harness their creativity and skills to transform these materials into new and unique pieces. Techniques such as patchwork, embellishment, and reconstruction are commonly employed, resulting in upcycled garments that bear a distinctive and individualized aesthetic, contributing to the allure of sustainable fashion. Measure fashion’s environmental impact Discover the water used, CO2 & phosphorus emissions related to a garment or fashion collection with our calculator. DOWNLOAD THE CALCULATOR Benefits of Upcycling in Fashion:1. Reduction of Textile Waste: Upcycling directly addresses the issue of textile waste by repurposing existing materials. This not only diverts textiles from landfills but also lessens the environmental impact of discarded clothing, a major concern in the fashion industry.2. Resource Conservation: By utilizing pre-existing materials, upcycling reduces the demand for new resources. This, in turn, lessens the environmental strain associated with the production of textiles, dyes, and other raw materials used in conventional fashion, contributing to the conservation of natural resources.3. Promotion of Creativity and Individuality: Upcycled fashion encourages creativity and individual expression. Each upcycled piece is a one-of-a-kind creation, reflecting the skill and vision of the designer. This uniqueness stands in stark contrast to the mass-produced nature of fast fashion, promoting a more personal and meaningful connection between consumers and their clothing.4. Consumer Education: Upcycling serves as a powerful tool for fostering awareness among consumers about the environmental impact of their fashion choices. By choosing upcycled garments, individuals actively participate in a more sustainable and responsible approach to fashion consumption, contributing to a shift in consumer behavior.Challenges and Opportunities:While upcycling presents a promising solution to the environmental issues associated with fast fashion, it is not without its challenges. The production of upcycled fashion can be more labor-intensive than traditional methods, potentially impacting costs. However, as the demand for sustainable fashion grows, opportunities arise for innovative business models and collaborations that prioritize both environmental and economic sustainability. If your company has surplus materials like textiles, yarns or trimmings, clear some space and earn money by selling it to other brands with Recovo.Conclusion:Upcycling represents an important step forward in the quest for a more sustainable and environmentally friendly fashion industry. By reimagining and reusing discarded materials, upcycled fashion not only reduces waste, but also celebrates creativity and individuality. As consumers become more conscious of the environmental impact of their choices, upcycling is emerging as an alternative that offers a path to a more responsible, ethical and circular future for the fashion industry. The path to sustainable fashion is evolving, and upcycling is proving to be a key player in this transformation process. DO YOU WANT TO BE UPDATED WITH ALL THE NEWS ABOUT CIRCULARITY IN FASHION? Subscribe to Newsletter

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What Is Circular Economy? Why it is Important?

What Is Circular Economy? Why it is Important?

What Is Circular Economy? Why It Is Important?In the face of escalating environmental concerns and a global imperative for sustainable practices, the concept of the circular economy has emerged as a transformative model of production and consumption. This innovative approach encompasses a spectrum of practices such as sharing, leasing, reusing, repairing, refurbishing, and recycling existing materials and products for as long as possible. The overarching goal is to extend the life cycle of products and minimize waste, charting a course away from the traditional linear economic model marked by a take-make-consume-throw away pattern. Reduce waste, minimize expenses and speed up the fashion production process, accesing real-time data on your internal stock with the Upcycling Saas by Recovo.This paradigm shift in economic thinking not only prioritizes the retention of materials within the economy at the end of a product’s life but also fosters their continual and productive reuse, thereby creating additional value through repeated utilization. Furthermore, it challenges the prevailing notion of planned obsolescence, where products are intentionally designed with a limited lifespan to incentivize consumer repurchases. Recognizing the significance of these principles, the European Parliament has taken steps to advocate for measures addressing and combatting planned obsolescence, championing a more sustainable and responsible approach to economic activities.Why Circular Economy in the Fashion Industry is Imperative:As the fashion industry stands at the crossroads of style and sustainability, the transition to a circular economy becomes imperative for several compelling reasons. The burgeoning global population not only amplifies the demand for raw materials but also accentuates the finite nature of these essential resources. This has led to certain European Union countries relying on other nations for the supply of crucial resources, unveiling economic interdependencies that further underscore the environmental consequences linked to raw material extraction and use.The extraction and utilization of raw materials in the fashion industry are accompanied by significant environmental impacts, contributing to increased energy consumption and heightened CO2 emissions. However, a shift towards a circular economy approach presents a strategic opportunity for a smarter and more sustainable use of raw materials. This paradigm shift can ultimately lead to a substantial reduction in CO2 emissions and encourage a heightened sense of environmental responsibility within the fashion sector. Measure fashion’s environmental impact Discover the water used, CO2 & phosphorus emissions related to a garment or fashion collection with our calculator. DOWNLOAD THE CALCULATOR Why Circular Economy Matters in Fashion:1. Reducing Environmental Impact: Circular fashion has the potential to minimize the industry’s environmental footprint by extending the life of garments, reducing waste, and lessening the demand for new raw materials.2. Conserving Resources: By promoting recycling and upcycling, circular fashion conserves valuable resources, alleviating the strain on ecosystems and mitigating the environmental consequences of resource extraction and production.3. Economic Opportunities: The circular fashion model not only aligns with environmental goals but also creates economic opportunities. This shift fosters new business models centered around repair, refurbishment, and recycling, potentially leading to job creation and economic growth within the sustainable fashion sector.4. Meeting Consumer Demands: With an increasing consumer focus on eco-friendly and ethically produced products, the adoption of circularity aligns with evolving consumer values, enhancing brand reputation and ensuring market competitiveness in an environmentally conscious era.Conclusion:In conclusion, the adoption of circular economy principles in the fashion industry is not just an environmental imperative but also a strategic move to meet the demands of an evolving consumer base. It holds the potential to create a more sustainable and economically viable future, where style and environmental responsibility coexist harmoniously, shaping a greener and more conscientious global fashion landscape. If your company has surplus materials like textiles, yarns or trimmings, clear some space and earn money by selling it to other brands with Recovo. DO YOU WANT TO BE UPDATED WITH ALL THE NEWS ABOUT CIRCULARITY IN FASHION? Subscribe to Newsletter

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